Tag: Psychology

Defence & Security

Protecting our protectors: Ensuring police officer mental health, safety and wellbeing

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an often debilitating mental health condition that results from witnessing or experiencing a single or series of traumatic events. Symptoms may include emotional flashbacks, dissociation, anxiety, hypervigilance, shame, depression, emotional numbness and in some cases psychosis. Until recently, there has been a lack of reliable or ‘ecologically valid’ (contextually relevant)…

21 Aug 2018, by Amy Sarcevic

Healthcare

Social Policy

Community exclusion and deviant behaviour

Recent figures indicate that 28 percent of inmates in Australian prisons are Aboriginal, despite Indigenous people making up just 3 percent of the national population. Aunty Kerrie Doyle, Associate Professor of Indigenous Health at RMIT, believes this significant over-representation is due to the ostracism faced by many Indigenous people, both in general society and in…

28 Jun 2018, by Amy Sarcevic

Social Policy

Technology

Can sentencing be enhanced with artificial intelligence?

Since the 17th century, judicial decisions have been handed down by human beings, for want of a better alternative. But oddly the arrival of a better alternative –artificial intelligence (AI) - has been met with doubt, concern and, in some cases, resistance. “There’s something distinctly uncomfortable and counter intuitive about letting a robot decide the…

29 May 2018, by Amy Sarcevic

Business

Leadership & Communication

Transport & Logistics

The yoga of rail

In an industry defined by rules, rigor and regulation it is often difficult to challenge the corporate traditions of rail. Much like train tracks, the sector is notoriously linear and logical; with objective decision-making and short-term operational demands often taking precedence over more transformative leadership efforts. On top of that, the high degree of multi-tasking…

22 May 2018, by Amy Sarcevic

Transport & Logistics

Mixed signals: SPAD-risk management and mitigation from the Network Controller perspective

The term ‘SPAD’ (signal passed at danger) is often considered the ‘Voldemort’ of the rail industry. It represents one of the sector’s most ominous safety concerns, given the potential for high consequence accidents, loss of life, and severe reputational damage to the offending organisation. SPAD violations have been attributed to a number of “human” errors,…

13 Apr 2018, by Amy Sarcevic

Healthcare

What does a person with dementia look like?

Dementia is a pervasive collection of symptoms, including memory loss, confusion, personality change, multi-sensory challenges, and apathy, caused by a number of disorders affecting the brain. These symptoms can make it very challenging for people living with dementia to carry out everyday tasks. But as renowned dementia advocate John Quinn describes, it is often the…

10 Apr 2018, by Amy Sarcevic

Leadership & Communication

Getting to know your inner-psychopath – why it’s hard to be good with money

Can we have too much of a good thing? When it comes to money, the answer in the Psychology community is increasingly ‘yes’. Psychologists have amassed considerable evidence for a causal link between money and self-interested behavior. Well-off people are statistically more likely to cheat in a game, less likely to help a passerby and,…

25 May 2017, by Amy Sarcevic

Leadership & Communication

NLP techniques: Improve learning by ‘anchoring’

Neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) can help you to achieve better results in the workplace, whether it is leadership development, improving negotiation skills or gaining confidence. NLP connects neurological processes, language and behavioural patterns learned through experience to help achieve specific life goals - and one of the techniques used to do this is 'anchoring'. Anchoring is…

2 Dec 2013, by test test

Leadership & Communication

Emotional intelligence ‘better at evaluating job success’ than IQ

Emotional intelligence is a bigger factor in career success than a high intelligence quotient (IQ), according to one researcher. Dr Jim Worth, a human development specialist with University of Missouri Extension, said a person's emotional intelligence quotient (EQ) is very important in a corporate environment. "First and foremost, research shows that executive EQ is directly…

18 Oct 2013, by test test

Leadership & Communication

Tips for improving your emotional intelligence

Possessing good emotional intelligence (EI) can be key in leadership development, enabling you to better handle high-pressure situations and rally team members to the cause. EI is the ability to recognise and understand your emotions and those of others, as well as using this information to build stronger interpersonal relationships and create calmer working environments.…

1 Oct 2013, by test test