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AFR Higher Education Awards 2017

Celebrate Australia’s best Higher Education providers at a one night only event in Sydney

29 August 2017 | Sofitel Sydney

Book Dinner

Entries now closed for the AFR Higher Education Awards 2017

overview

The Australia Financial Review is proud to be hosting the third annual AFR Higher Education Awards on 29 August, 2017. Presented by UniSuper, the Awards are an initiative to highlight at a national level the tremendous contribution that the Higher Education sector makes to Australian prosperity and quality of life.

The Awards will be judged by an independent panel of eminent Higher Education veterans.

The categories for 2017 are:

  • Community Engagement Award, sponsored by UniSuper.
  • Education Technology Award
  • Emerging Leader Award, sponsored by Perrett Laver.
  • Employability Award, sponsored by Pearson.
  • Equity and Opportunity Award,
  • Facilities Innovation Award
  • Industry Engagement Award, sponsored by Technology One
  • International Education Award sponsored by Top Education Institute.
  • Learning Experience Award
  • Lifetime Achievement Award, sponsored by UniSuper.

unisuper

UniSuper is Australia’s dedicated superannuation fund for people working in the higher education and research sector. With approximately 400,000 members and around $60 billion in net assets under management, we’re one of Australia’s largest super funds.

For more than 30 years, UniSuper has worked alongside Australia’s universities and research institutes delivering high quality, value-for-money retirement saving products and services. We are proud of the contribution the higher education sector makes in Australia and are thrilled to be the presenting partner at this year’s AFR Higher Education Awards.

We have assembled an independent judging panel composed of some of the most esteemed figures in Higher Education: former Vice Chancellors, former Chancellors, and experts from the worlds of international, online and private Higher Education. This distinguished group will meet in early October to review applications and select a shortlist of up to four finalists including an Award winner, for each category.

Our judging panel will look for evidence of innovation, impact, clear improvement in outcomes, value/efficiency and solid outcomes related to the sector’s core educational mission. The most outstanding initiatives may not be the largest or most high-profile: the judges will take into account wherever possible the specific scale, resources, and challenges of the applying institution. We encourage Higher Education institutions of all sizes and types to make a case for the initiatives of which they are most proud.

Emerging Leader Award Sponsor
perrett-laver
Employability Award Sponsor
Logo
Industry Engagement Award sponsor
technology1

International Education Award Sponsor

technology1

Community Engagement Award Sponsor
unisuper

Facilities Innovation Award Sponsor
atira

Higher Education Awards 2017 will be presented by
James Valentine, Musician, Presenter and Entertainer

Judging panel:

Riley Batchelor
CEO, EduGrowth

Tim Dodd
education editor, The Australian Financial Review

Helen Garnett PSM
inaugural vice-chancellor, Charles Darwin University

Stuart Hamilton AO
former CEO, Open Universities Australia

Adrian McComb
former CEO, Council of Private Higher Education

Lisa Paul AO PSM
former secretary, Commonwealth Department of Education and Training

Alan Robson AO
former vice-chancellor, University of Western Australia

Bill Scales AO
former chancellor, Swinburne University of Technology

Categories

Please be sure to address all criteria and provide as much evidence as possible on each. You can attach up to 4 A4 pages of documentation in support of your entry; written references as well as evidence of positive outcomes are advised.

This Award aims to recognise strategies and initiatives that bring together students and external communities or community groups in a way that delivers significant and demonstrable benefits to both – and contributes meaningfully to the educational and social goals of the Higher Education sector.

For the purposes of this Award, community can be interpreted broadly. A target community may be defined by geographical parameters (local, regional, state, national or global), or by social, cultural, circumstantial or other parameters (e.g. indigenous Australians, asylum-seekers, the elderly, unemployed youth, etc.); or it may be a combination of the two. Alternatively, community could refer to the public at large. Engagement initiatives involving community groups and associations, educational institutions (e.g. schools and TAFEs), and not-for-profit and non-governmental organisations are also eligible for this Award.

Examples of eligible initiatives or strategies might include: volunteer programs, integrated service learning, internships/placements/practicum, community outreach and development initiatives, community organising, community research, knowledge exchange initiatives, community education, economic development programs, cooperative education initiatives, etc.

The principal criteria for assessing entries in this category are:

  • Demonstrated positive impact on the community – To what extent has this initiative/strategy improved the lives or prospects of community members? What identified problem, opportunity or societal issue does it address? How many community members have benefited? Has community participation in the initiative increased since its inception?
  • Demonstrated positive impact on participating students – To what extent has this initiative fostered civic values, enhanced learning, built valuable skills, or contributed to a new outlook amongst the participating students? How can you evidence this? Has student participation in the initiative increased since its inception? Do students play a significant role in designing and leading the initiative as well as delivering it?
  • Collaborative approach How, and by whom, was this initiative/strategy initiated? What role did the community play in identifying the challenge, determining goals and designing the program? What ongoing role do community members play in the initiative? Have you encountered and overcome any obstacles in the relationship? Can you demonstrate a positive impact on the culture, attitudes, behaviour or values of both parties? More broadly, how does your initiative contribute to a closer relationship between the Higher Education sector and the relevant community?
  • Innovation – How is your initiative/strategy innovative in concept, objective, approach, design, delivery or content?
  • Institutional support – How well does your initiative connect with your institutions larger public engagement strategy, and has your institution demonstrated commitment to this initiative by supporting it either financially, in kind, or through policy and recognition of its value?
  • Value for investment – How do the outcomes of your initiative for students and the community compare to the investment of resources, time and effort required to deliver and maintain it?
  • Sustainability and scalability – How will the initiative find sufficient resources to continue running in the longer term? Are the relevant communities committed to sustaining the initiative into the future? Is your initiative scalable and potentially applicable to other relevant communities or other units/departments/institutions? Does it have the potential to significantly promote and elevate community engagement in the Higher Education sector as a whole?

Educational technology has emerged as a driver of progress and innovation throughout all levels of education. Schools, TAFEs, Universities, government and corporate educators continue to incorporate educational technology to continually improve all parts of the learning experience. The question is no longer whether edtech will become entrenched in educational pedagogy but rather how much it will revolutionise our attitudes and methods of teaching, learning and evolving world-class educational institutions.

The pathways between industry and business are becoming more defined on the platform of edtech, with all sectors realising the potential that strong links with education can now bring to their own innovation cultures. By their nature, educational institutions are well placed to provide the guidance, research and investment to provide the critical support needed for young, tech based businesses to effectively innovate and scale.

For this reason, we are proud to include the Education Technology Award at the AFR’s Higher Education Awards.

The judging panel is looking for nominations of projects that:

  • Demonstrate clear objectives, with measurable outcomes to drive success for both the institution and service provider.
  • Provide clear evidence of their improved outcomes and practices through the development or utilisation of edtech
  • Embody the sector’s core values of curiosity, innovation and passion for learning management through, and with technology

Education technology refers to the effective use of technological tools for learning. Examples include recruitment and admissions; online courses provision; testing and assessment; teaching and learning; accreditation and credentials management; data analytics; internship management; student financing; parental engagement and infrastructure tools.

The principal criteria for assessing entries in this category are:

  • Demonstrated Positive Impact – what demonstrable and measurable impact has the product had on learning outcomes? To what extent has it successfully addressed an identified problem or challenge, and on what scale? How has it enhanced the learning outcomes of students and/or improved the management of students, staff or alumni? Has it contributed to better student employability outcomes?
  • Innovation – how is the product innovative in concept, objective, approach, design, delivery or content? Has it encouraged the development of new pedagogical approaches to learning?
  • Value for investment – how do the outcomes of the edtech product compare to the investment of resources, time and effort required to deliver and maintain it? In addition to positive results, does the product deliver any efficiency or productivity gains on previous practices?
  • Sustainability and scalability – Is the product scalable and potentially applicable to other units/departments/institutions? Does it have the potential to significantly elevate practices and outcomes in the Higher Education sector as a whole?

In addition to the above eligibility for Higher Education Providers, this award is also open to any Australian-registered company developing education technology products and services. Eligibility in this category does not require companies to be listed in the TEQSA National Register of Higher Education Providers.

The Emerging Leader Award will recognise a young leader who is already on track to effecting positive change for their institution and for the sector as a whole. Institutions may only nominate ONE candidate for this award, and the application requires sign-off by the head of the institution.

The judging panel is looking for nominations of individuals who:

  • Are Australian Permanent Residents and have been employed in  the Higher Education sector for 15 years or less
  • Have a track record of transformational leadership, whether in teaching, research, administration, policy or management
  • Can provide clear evidence of improved outcomes and practices at an institutional, sectoral, state/territory, national or global level as a direct result of their leadership
  • Have embodied the sector’s core values of reason, curiosity, innovation, humility, and passion for creating, transmitting and receiving knowledge; and have inspired those around them with their vision, ability and personal integrity

The winner will be chosen on the basis of verifiable evidence of their leadership achievements and the scope and scale of their positive effect on Higher Education policy and practices.

This Award is for strategies or initiatives that have demonstrably enhanced student employment outcomes (i.e., resulted in a higher rate of relevant employment upon completion of a course). Initiatives focussed on improving the performance of students already in employment, or on improving the institution’s ability to gather and interpret meaningful data around employment outcomes, are also eligible when such improvements can be compellingly evidenced.

Examples of eligible initiatives or strategies might include: work placements, networking opportunities, cooperative learning, work-orientated projects, service-learning, course/curriculum redesign, business and professional collaborations, initiatives to develop broader graduate attributes, initiatives to improve collection of employment data or employability methodology, etc.

The principal criteria for assessing entries in this category are:

  • Demonstrated Positive Impact – What demonstrable and measurable impact has your initiative had on employment rates and/or workplace performance within its target community? Can you show a clear trend of improved outcomes in the period since the initiative began? Has the initiative grown and/or attracted new participants since its inception? Can you demonstrate a further impact on the culture, attitudes, behaviour, feedback or values of employers or students?
  • Innovation – how is your initiative innovative in concept, objective, approach, design, delivery or content?
  • Institutional support – how well does your initiative connect with your institution’s larger strategy around employability, and has your institution demonstrated commitment to this initiative by supporting it either financially, in kind, or through policy and recognition of its value?
  • Value for investment – how do the outcomes of your initiative compare to the investment of resources, time and effort required to deliver and maintain it? In addition to positive results, does the initiative deliver any efficiency or productivity gains on previous practices?
  • Sustainability and scalability – how sustainable is your initiative over the longer term? Is your initiative scalable and potentially applicable to other units/departments/institutions? Does it have the potential to significantly elevate practices and outcomes in the Higher Education sector as a whole?

This category is for strategies or initiatives that have significantly improved participation rates, engagement, educational outcomes, personal development opportunities, or employment opportunities of under-represented or non-traditional student groups.

Examples of eligible initiatives or strategies might include: innovative pathways, access programs, transition and retention strategies, pastoral care initiatives, personal development programs, and employability initiatives, all aimed at under-represented or non-traditional student groups.

The principal criteria for assessing entries in this category are:

  • Demonstrated Positive Impact – To what extent, and on what scale, has your initiative increased participation and retention rates, educational outcomes, or employment opportunities within its target non-traditional or disadvantaged community? To what extent has it successfully addressed an identified problem or challenge, and on what scale? Can you show a clear trend of improved outcomes in the period since the initiative began? Has the initiative grown and/or attracted new participants since its inception? Can you demonstrate a further impact on the culture, attitudes, behaviour or values of students, staff, employers or the institution? More broadly, how does your initiative contribute to a more equitable society?
  • Innovation – how is your initiative innovative in concept, objective, approach, design, delivery or content?
  • Institutional support – how well does your initiative connect with your institution’s larger equity and opportunity strategy, and has your institution demonstrated commitment to this initiative by supporting it either financially, in kind, or through policy and recognition of its value?
  • Value for investment – how do the outcomes of your initiative compare to the investment of resources, time and effort required to deliver and maintain it? In addition to positive results, does the initiative deliver any efficiency or productivity gains on previous practices?
  • Sustainability and scalability – how sustainable is your initiative over the longer term? Is your initiative scalable and potentially applicable to other units/departments/institutions? Does it have the potential to significantly elevate practices and outcomes in the Higher Education sector as a whole?

This Award is for innovative capital/facilities projects or strategies that represent exceptional value for investment and have demonstrably enhanced the student and/or staff experience on campus.

This category encompasses all aspects of the built environment, including teaching and lecture spaces, labs, libraries, accommodation, leisure spaces, catering, enterprise, ICT installations and overall campus design. Eligible initiatives need not only be new builds; refurbishments, redevelopments, and alternative facilities strategies including innovative rental or shared facilities arrangements, are all eligible.

The judging panel is looking for innovation and value throughout the delivery chain, from master plan, design and financing through to delivery, maintenance and operation.

The principal criteria for assessing entries in this category are:

  • Innovation – how is your initiative or strategy innovative in concept, objective, approach, design, delivery or content? Consider each step of the delivery chain, including financing and operations management. Does it enable further innovation, for example in research, teaching or entrepreneurship?
  • Demonstrated Positive Impact – To what extent has your project successfully addressed an identified problem or challenge? What benefits has it delivered to students and/or staff in the short-term? On what scale is this impact, and how can you evidence it? Can you demonstrate increased usage, collaboration, safety, or other tangible outcomes? What further benefits do you anticipate in the coming decades?  More broadly, how does it improve upon national best practice in its area, and potentially contribute to driving improvement in facilities across the sector as a whole?
  • Value for investment – To what extent does your project represent value for money? How do the diverse benefits derived from your project stack up against to the investment of resources, time and effort required to deliver and maintain it? Can you evidence significant efficiency or productivity gains as a result of the project?
  • Institutional context – How well does your initiative serve your institution’s larger campus/facilities strategy? Is it being used as a model for further initiatives?
  • Sustainability and scalability – how sustainable is your initiative over the longer term? Could your project or its guiding principles be utilised for other projects? Does it have the potential to significantly elevate practices and outcomes in the Higher Education sector as a whole?

This Award aims to recognise Higher Education institutions working with industry in a way that goes beyond standard commercial relationships and is genuinely reciprocal, mutually beneficial, and highly valued by both partners. To be eligible, entries must show clear evidence of reciprocal investment/contribution and positive outcomes for both parties. The judges are particularly interested in how the Higher Education institutions involved have discovered and defined what the industry partner(s) was looking for, and shaped that insight into a mutually beneficial relationship.

For the purposes of this Award, “industry” is defined as publically- and privately-owned businesses and enterprises, as well as Government Business Entities (e.g. Australia Post) and employer bodies such as industry skills councils, industry and professional associations, unions, regulatory and licensing bodies, etc. Collaborations with branches of government and not-for profits are not within the scope of this Award; some such initiatives may be eligible for the Community Engagement Award.

Examples of eligible initiatives or strategies might include: research and development institutes, joint ventures and groups; industry-integrated courses and programs; industry-led educational innovations; industry-informed learning standards and assessment development, collaborative policy initiatives, etc.

The principal criteria for assessing entries in this category are:

  • Reciprocal understanding – How, and by whom, was this initiative/strategy initiated? How did you discover and define the problem or challenge that industry was seeking to address? What is the driving motivation for each partner, and what other important factors and influences have you had to take into consideration in structuring the relationship/initiative? Have you encountered and overcome any obstacles in the relationship? What does each partner contribute, and has their involvement/investment increased since the relationship began? Can you demonstrate a positive impact on the culture, attitudes, behaviour or values of both parties? More broadly, how does it contribute to better understanding and a more productive dialogue between industry and the Higher Education sector?
  • Demonstrated Mutual Benefits – What financial, educational, social, environmental or other benefits has each party derived from your initiative, and on what scale? To what extent has it successfully addressed the core problem or challenge faced by the industry partner? What particular benefits has the participating Higher Education institution enjoyed? Has the initiative grown and/or attracted new participants since its inception? Has the initiative resulted in any further collaboration on other matters?
  • Innovation – How is your engagement initiative/strategy innovative in concept, objective, approach, design, delivery or content? Has the collaboration produced something new, or resulted in the development of a new way for the parties to work together?
  • Institutional support – How well does your initiative connect with your institution’s larger public engagement strategy, and has your institution demonstrated commitment to this initiative by supporting it either financially, in kind, or through policy and recognition of its value?
  • Value for investment – How do the outcomes of your initiative compare to the investment of resources, time and effort required to deliver and maintain it? Does the initiative deliver any efficiency or productivity gains to your own institution?
  • Sustainability and scalability – How sustainable is your initiative over the longer term? Is your initiative scalable and potentially applicable to other organisations/industries or other units/departments/institutions? Does it have the potential to significantly promote and elevate engagement with industry in the Higher Education sector as a whole?

This Award is for strategies or initiatives that have demonstrably enhanced outcomes or improved on standard practice in in-bound, out-bound or collaborative international education, including off-shore campuses.

Examples of eligible initiatives or strategies might include: preparation, cultural integration, safety or post-graduation support initiatives for in-bound or out-bound international students; international brand establishment; innovative transnational partnerships, digital or other initiatives for engaging with off-shore students and staff; strategies to deal with changing policy or other circumstances in the environment in which you operate; etc.

The principal criteria for assessing entries in this category are:

  • Demonstrated Positive Impact – What demonstrable and measurable impact has your initiative had on international education outcomes? To what extent has it successfully addressed an identified problem or challenge, and on what scale? Can you show a clear trend of improved outcomes in the period since the initiative began? Has the initiative grown and/or attracted new participants since its inception? Can you demonstrate a further impact on the culture, attitudes, behaviour or values of participants, particular with regards to the development of a more truly global, diverse and collaborative culture? More broadly, how does it enhance Australia’s position in the global Higher Education market and/or contribute to a more globally conscious, connected and collaborative society?
  • Innovation – how is your initiative innovative in concept, objective, approach, design, delivery or content?
  • Institutional support – how well does your initiative connect with your institution’s larger internationalisation strategy, and has your institution demonstrated commitment to this initiative by supporting it either financially, in kind, or through policy and recognition of its value??
  • Value for investment – how do the outcomes of your initiative compare to the investment of resources, time and effort required to deliver and maintain it? In addition to positive results, does the initiative deliver any efficiency or productivity gains on previous practices?
  • Sustainability and scalability – how sustainable is your initiative over the longer term? Is your initiative scalable and potentially applicable to other units/departments/institutions? Does it have the potential to significantly elevate practices and outcomes in the Higher Education sector as a whole?

This Award is for strategies or initiatives that have delivered real and significant improvements to the learning experience and educational outcomes of both domestic and international students.

Examples of eligible initiatives or strategies might include: digital or blended learning innovations; new pedagogical approaches, teacher support/training initiatives, curriculum redesign, transition/retention initiatives, feedback or assessment initiatives, etc.

The principal criteria for assessing entries in this category are:

  • Demonstrated Positive Impact – what demonstrable and measurable impact has your initiative had on learning outcomes? To what extent has it successfully addressed an identified problem or challenge, and on what scale? Can you show a clear trend of improved outcomes in the period since the initiative began? Has the initiative grown and/or attracted new participants since its inception? Can you demonstrate a further impact on the culture, attitudes, behaviour or values of participants?
  • Innovation – how is your initiative innovative in concept, objective, approach, design, delivery or content?
  • Institutional support – how well does your initiative connect with your institution’s larger teaching and learning strategy, and has your institution demonstrated commitment to this initiative by supporting it either financially, in kind, or through policy and recognition of its value?
  • Value for investment – how do the outcomes of your initiative compare to the investment of resources, time and effort required to deliver and maintain it? In addition to positive results, does the initiative deliver any efficiency or productivity gains on previous practices?
  • Sustainability and scalability – how sustainable is your initiative over the longer term? Is your initiative scalable and potentially applicable to other units/departments/institutions? Does it have the potential to significantly elevate practices and outcomes in the Higher Education sector as a whole?

The UniSuper Lifetime Achievement Award will honour an individual’s outstanding contribution to the Australian Higher Education sector over a lifetime of leadership, innovation and service.

The judging panel is looking for nominations of individuals who:

  • Have 25 years or more of service and excellence within the Australian Higher Education sector
  • Have significantly advanced and improved practices in Higher Education through their leadership and advocacy at an institution, sectorial, state/territory, national or global level
  • Have made world-class and sustained personal contributions in research, teaching, administration and/or policy
  • Have embodied the sector’s core values of innovation, reason, curiosity, humility, and passion for creating, transmitting and receiving knowledge
  • Have inspired those around them with their vision, ability and personal integrity

The winner will be chosen on the basis of verifiable evidence of achievement and peer recognition.

Nominees for this category do NOT need to be currently employed in the Higher Education sector to be eligible, but they DO need to be permanent residents of Australia.

Nominations for this Award are open and can be received from any individual, unit or institution.

Awards Gala Dinner

7pm 29 August 2017 | Sofitel Sydney

The Winners of the AFR Higher Education Awards will be announced and honoured at a sumptuous Gala Dinner, presented by UniSuper, on 29 August 7pm. The Gala will take place at the Sofitel Sydney Wentworth.

The evening will commence with a drinks reception, followed by dinner and the presentation of the AFR Higher Education Awards. The dress code is cocktail/business attire.

You can book individual places or tables of 10 using our online booking system (below). Once you have booked your places you will receive a confirmation email that will include a link allowing you to submit your guests’ details. If you have any problems with your booking, please email info@informa.com.au

BOOK DINNER

2017 Winners

  • Community Engagement Award, sponsored by UniSuper

Central Queensland University – Choices Applied Theatre Project
Judges’ comments:  Choices is a long-standing collaboration effort by CQUniversity with government and community organisations which has demonstrated a high degree of effectiveness in addressing a very important community problem. The program has made a real difference with its innovative and creative approach.

 

  • Education Technology Award

Swinburne University of Technology – Quitch
Judges’ comments:  Quitch is a highly innovative, mobile-first learning application which was initially funded by the university, has attracted private investment and been spun out into an operating company. It is demand from other education institutions and we are impressed by its focus on better learning outcomes and improved student retention.

 

  • Employability Award, sponsored by Pearson

Macquarie University – Enhancing the Employability of Macquarie Graduates
Judges’ comment:  The program at Macquarie University is notable for its size – with over 8000 students expected to participate this year – its breadth across all the university faculties, and its large-scale engagement with 2500 partner organisations. It is making a major contribution to solving the problem of how to offer all students real-world work experience.

 

  • Equity and Opportunity Award

La Trobe and Federation University – Higher Education for Care Leavers Strategy
Judges’ comment:  This is a praiseworthy and innovative program to assist a highly-disadvantaged and significantly under-represented group to succeed in higher education and enjoy successful lives. It is impressive because of the focus it has brought to the issue, the results, it has achieved and its potential to be replicated for other disadvantaged and under under-represented groups within higher education.

 

  • Facilities Innovation Award sponsored by Atira Student Living

RMIT – The 40-year life-cycle
Judges’ comment:  The panel was impressed by the effort to make better use of existing facilities in the university, which has the worthwhile goal of achieving more efficient resource utilization of an important and significant part of a university’s capital base. The judges wish to encourage more institutions to enter this category next year.

 

  • Emerging Leader Award, sponsored by Perrett Laver

Professor David Reilly from the University of Sydney
Judges’ comments:  David Reilly is an outstanding leader who has helped put Australia at the forefront of quantum nanoscience, a leading-edge technology of the 21st century.

 

  • Industry Engagement Award, sponsored by TechnologyOne

Monash University – Monash Industry Team Initiative: MITI
Judges’ comment:  This initiative has led to very successful collaboration between the university and business, across a broad range of industry sectors and organisations. It has involved researchers and students and brought cross-disciplinary expertise to bear on real-world problems, including in advanced manufacturing, which are producing commercial outcomes.

 

  • International Education Award, sponsored by Top Education Institute

University of Adelaide – China Career Ready Plus Program
Judges’ comment:  This is an innovative program to help Chinese students prepare for not only possible employment in Australia, but also in the global labour market. It supports students from Australia’s largest international education market to achieve the career outcomes they want and helps safeguard the future of international education, Australia’s third-largest export industry.

 

  • Learning Experience Award

UTS – UTS: Hatchery
Judges’ comment:  The UTS:Hatchery programs are an innovative learning experience for students in entrepreneurial thinking and real-world problem solving which offers them an opportunity to develop their own start-up business. A key measure of its success is the strong growth in female participation.

 

  • Lifetime Achievement Award

Professor Bruce Chapman AM

Bruce Chapman is the architect of Australia’s higher education contribution scheme, a world-leading innovation in public policy which has stood the test of time.

For nearly three decades Australia’s higher education system has been underpinned by the income contingent load system which was proposed by Bruce in the late 1980s and adopted by the Hawke government in 1989.

Its hallmark is fairness, and it is thanks to Bruce’s work that Australia has been able to expand access to higher education in an equitable and cost-effective way.

Since his initial conceptual breakthrough Bruce has continued his work in the field and is now one of the foremost international authorities on education funding whose advice is sought world-wide. He continues to make major contributions to policy development in education funding and the broader public debate about education.

The measure of his achievement is that many other countries have since adopted variation of the income contingent loan system for funding higher education that was pioneered in Australia.

Finalists

The finalists in the 2017 Australian Financial Review Higher Education Awards include a critical thinking program for marginalised youth, a gamified learning app for mobile devices, a service program for students in Indigenous communities and an augmented reality module for teaching physiology and anatomy.

Over 100 entries were considered by the judging panel, the most entered in the awards, which are presented by UniSuper. Now in their third year, the prestigious awards recognise innovation and achievement in Australia’s higher education sector.

Winners in each category will be announced at a gala dinner on August 29, during The Australian Financial Review Higher Education Summit.

Community Engagement (sponsored by UniSuper)

University of Melbourne – Teddy Bear Hospital: 
The university’s largest community engagement project involving nearly 2000 volunteer students a year,helping medical students relate to kids and helping children understand health.

Central Queensland University – Choices, an applied theatre project: It reaches over 3000 year 12 students from Townsville to Rockhampton with safety messages around alcohol, drugs and sexual activity before they go to Schoolies Week.

Macquarie University – National Indigenous Science Education Program: The program gives Indigenous students the confidence to harness the power of education, realise their potential and become future leaders. It now also involves Charles Sturt University ,Edith Cowan University and partner schools.

University of Sydney – Service Learning in Indigenous Communities: Indigenous communities host university students who work on projects selected by the community in multi-disciplinary teams,which contributes to student assessment and gives them the opportunity for personal growth.

Education Technology

UNSW and University of Queensland – BEST Network’s Slice: A collaborative biomedical image repository used for teaching with easy access for multiple teaching institutions and advanced features including an annotation tool.

University of Melbourne – My eQuals: Enables students and graduates of universities in Australia and New Zealand to access digital versions of their academic documents and share them with universities, employers and other parties.

Bond University – Augmented Reality: A suite of innovative physiology and anatomy augmented reality modules for health, science and medicine at Bond University,which have improved student learning and increased class engagement and lecture attendances.

Swinburne University – Quitch: A content-neutral, gamified, mobile learning platform for instruction and assessment,which includes a motivational feedback system and robust data analytics.

Emerging leader (Sponsored by Perrett Laver)

UNSW – Angela Moles: Professor Moles is an internationally leading figure in the field of‘ ‘big’’ ecology with an exceptional record in research and scholarship, who has been successful in abroad range of leadership, mentoring and out reach initiatives.

Deakin University – Emma Kowal: Through her cross – disciplinary research in anthropology, medicine and public health, Professor Kowal has pioneered approaches to reversing Indigenous disadvantage and ensuring Indigenous people can benefit from advanced healthcare.

University of Sydney – David Reilly: Professor Reilly was instrumental in establishing the university’s $150 million Nanoscience Hub and his work underpins Australia’s progress in the race to build a quantum computer.

Employability (Sponsored by Pearson)

Deakin University – Graduate Employability Program: The program builds the learning of employability skills into the curriculum and helps students explore career options,build work experience and connect with prospective employers.

Macquarie University – Professional and Community Engagement:The PACE program is a whole-of-university work-integrated-learning program which enhances employability and citizenship capability by enabling all
undergraduates to engage in practical learning experiences with industry and community.

ANU – College of Business and Economics Internship Program: The program gives students the opportunity to strengthen their employability skills in the Australian professional workplace, placing interns with employers for course credit.

Equity and opportunity

La Trobe University and Federation University Australia – Higher Education for Care Leavers Strategy: The program provides outreach, academic and financial support to assist people who have spent time in foster, residential, or kinship care (care leavers) to succeed at university.

University of Wollongong – Outreach and Pathways Team: The team engages with individuals in targeted schools and communities to build aspirations for, awareness of and attainment in higher education.

University of Queensland – Critical Thinking Project: Assists teachers and schools to move to a‘‘teaching for thinking’’pedagogy and promotes higher education aspirations among marginalised youth, building their capacity for critical and innovative thinking.

University of Newcastle – Building Clarity Through Simplicity: A targeted and personalised communications campaign to help course students make the transition to university, leading to increased enrolments.

St Catherine’s College, University of WA – Dandjoo Darbalung: A program which supports Indigenous students transition from school to university and into employment with a retention rate over 90 per cent.

Industry engagement (Sponsored by Technology One)

University of Queensland – Boeing Brisbane Technology Centre: Boeing research and technology staff are
embedded with university researchers, sharing research infrastructure and inspiring students to seek aerospace careers.

Federation University Australia – Partners in Learning: A deep, long term partnership with IBM which led to an IT degree offering real industry experience, scholarship funding for students and support for the recently established P-TECH pilot school.

University of Adelaide – Future of Photonics Innovation: A partnership with Trajan Scientific and Medical which lead to a photonics research and development and manufacturing hub.

Monash University – Monash Industry Team Initiative: Embeds high-performing, multi-disciplinary students at bachelor, masters and PhD level in industry to solve real problems leading to commercial outcomes.

University of Canberra – Ducere Global Business School – Master of Business Administration: An MBA delivered by Ducere in partnership with the University of Canberra, based on industry project work with a high level of practical learning and industry engagement.

International education (Sponsored by Top Education Institute)

Monash University – IITB – Monash Research Academy: A research collaboration with the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, with 400 researchers, nearly 200 research students and 400 research projects to date.

Deakin University – Deakin India Research Initiative: Enables top Indian students to pursue PhD study and research national problems in collaboration with Australian researchers and with access to Australian research facilities.

University of Adelaide – China Career Ready Plus: An initiative to boost Chinese international students’ career outcomes with programs to increase students’ readiness for employment and offer placements with employers.

University of Notre Dame – Doors of Opportunity: A program which offers service learning opportunities for education,medicine and arts students in Kenya, India and Timor Leste.

Learning experience

University of Notre Dame – Beyond Memorising: The Notre Dame Anatomy Approach has been highly successful in teaching anatomy to medical students with multi-modal techniques including self-directed learning, collaborative problem solving and senior students supporting junior students.

La Trobe University – Digital Identity: Making Your Mark!: An adaptive e-learning module on digital literacies that empowers students to evaluate the impact of their e-reputation and the power of social media on their academic, professional and social lives.

Western Sydney University – PASS (Peer Assisted Study Sessions) Online: An online, weekly, peer-led collaborative learning program which has successfully led to higher grades for participants.

UTS – Hatchery: The university’s Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Creative Intelligence Unit’s programs in the Hatchery start-up incubator are in high demand from students,helping them engage with industry and the innovation ecosystem.

Other categories

Two other award categories are still to be announced. The Lifetime Achievement Award – which honours an individual’s outstanding contribution to higher education over a lifetime of leadership,innovation and service–will be announced on August 14. The winner of the Facilities Innovation Award will be announced on August 29. Judges decided not to select finalists in this category.

Higher Education Summit

For more information on Higher Education Summit please click here

FAQ

What are the dates for 2017?

3 April – Entries open
9 July – Entries close
31 July– Finalists will be announced in the Financial Review
14 August – Lifetime Achievement winner will be announced in the Financial Review
29 August – Award winners announced at Awards Gala, Sofitel Sydney Wentworth

 

How much does it cost to enter the awards?

Nothing – entry is free.

 

Who can enter?

All categories (with the exception of Education Technology category)
These awards are open to all institutions, public and private, that are listed in the TEQSA National Register of Higher Education Providers. This includes self-accrediting institutions (including universities) and TEQSA-accredited institutions offering Australian Qualifications Framework qualifications at associate degree level and above, and/or diplomas and advanced diplomas accredited in the Australian Higher Education sector. Institutions operating across multiple educational levels (ie VET and HE) must clearly show that their nominated strategies or initiatives are drawn from the HE side of their business.

As well as Higher Education Providers, this award is also open to any Australian-registered company developing education technology products and services used in higher education. Eligibility in this category does not require companies to be listed in the TEQSA National Register of Higher Education Providers.

 

Can we enter more than one category?

Institutions may enter as many categories as they wish, but must complete a separate submission for each category.

 

Can we submit more than one entry in a single category?

Only one entry per institution per category is allowed in most categories, which is why we require sign-off by the head of the relevant institution. The exception to this is the Lifetime Achievement award, for which we will accept nominations/applications from anyone without the need for institutional sign-off.

 

What period do these awards relate to?

Our judges will be judging applications based on core achievements that have taken place in the period 25 June 2016 – 25 June 2017. Naturally, projects that have had sufficient time to produce results and show real impact are more likely to be successful than projects still in their preliminary stages.

 

How will I know that my submission has been received?

Once you have pressed the submit button, you will see a confirmation page indicating the successful receipt of your entry. You can then return to the Awards homepage to make further applications in other categories. Please advise us if any of your contact details change once your application has been submitted.

 

Are collaborative entries accepted?

Yes, but the application should come from a single lead institution. You can name any other contributing HE institutions or external partners in the ‘Institution name’ field on the application form, and if your submission is shortlisted, we will give due credit to partners at the awards ceremony and in any media features or profiles.

 

When is the closing date for entries?

Applications close at midnight on 9th July 2017.

 

How are the entries judged?

An eminent panel of Higher Education experts will meet to review applications against the selection criteria and choose our winners. See the JUDGING section of this website and well as the individual selection criteria of each Award.

 

When are finalists announced?

A shortlist of finalists for each category will be announced in The Australian Financial Review on 7th August 2017.

 

When are winners announced?

Announcement of the winners will be made at the Awards Gala, sponsored by UniSuper, on 29th August at the Sofitel Sydney Wentworth.

 

Can I re-enter the same initiative/strategy/project next year if I don’t win this time?

Yes. Very promising initiatives may simply need slightly more time to be able to sufficiently demonstrate their full impact. We will happily consider repeat entries in 2017, provided they show further evidence of positive outcomes.

 

I won last year; can I re-enter this year?

You cannot re-enter the same initiative/strategy/project in the same category that it won last year, though you could potentially enter it in a different category, if you can make a strong case for it. However, you can certainly enter a different initiative/strategy/project in the same category you won last year.

 

How do I book tickets for the event?

You can book individual places or tables of 10 using our online booking system HERE. Once you have booked your places you will receive a confirmation email that will include a link allowing you to submit your guests’ details. If you have any problems with your booking, please email info@informa.com.au.

 

What is the dress code for the evening?

The Awards Gala is Cocktail/Business Attire.

 

What happens if I have purchased a ticket but am unable to attend?

Tickets are non-refundable but can be transferred to a colleague. In the event of a change in attendee, please email the new attendee’s details to info@informa.com.au as soon as possible.

 

Are under-18s allowed to attend the awards evening?

The venue’s licence does not preclude under-18s from attending; however we do suggest that the event might not be appropriate for younger children.

 

In addition to the above eligibility for Higher Education Providers, this award is also open to any Australian-registered company developing education technology products and services. Eligibility in this category does not require companies to be listed in the TEQSA National Register of Higher Education Providers.

 

Got a further question?

For queries relating to Awards categories, criteria, process or submissions, please contact Christopher Platt at Christopher.Platt@informa.com

If your question relates to the Awards Gala, please contact info@informa.com.au

Welcome drinks at 7pm
Dinner to commence at 7.30pm

when & where

29 Aug 2017

Sofitel Sydney Wentworth

contact

Still have a question?

Chris Platt
Conference Manager
+61 2 9080 4037
Christopher.Platt@informa.com

Alex Cook
Sponsorship & Exhibition Manager
+61 2 9080 4425
Alex.Cook@informa.com.au

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